The Rondo Hatton Report #3

A new issue of The Rondo Hatton Report is out, featuring the following contributions:

  • The Origins Of IINK / Román García Albertos
  • Cruisin’ For A Ruben / Sue Barashy
  • Zappa’s Music Is A Time Machine / Guillaume Dauzou & Sabrina Bergamin
  • Nostalgia For The Old Folks? / Tom Demonay
  • I’m A Bandleader / Richard Hemmings
  • Ten (Zen) Commendments / Simon Prentis
  • Pourquoi Vouloir Mettre Un Caniche Dans Un Bocal? / John Raby
  • A View From India / Mahesh Ramchandani
  • There Is Such A Thing As Progress / Hugo Vanneck
  • One More Time For The World / English Versions

The free download is available here for your reading pleasure.

36 Responses to “The Rondo Hatton Report #3”

  1. Bob says:

    It’s Bob Day here at KUR…

    …just read the “■The Origins Of IINK / Román García Albertos” article. Fun stuff. I look forward to reading the rest of the “Report”.

  2. Bálint says:

    Román’s article – great! Always loved that site – thanks for the work!

  3. Cotti says:

    Nice reading.

    Roman still haven’t made a page for Greasy Love Songs. I wonder what’s happening…

  4. urbangraffito says:

    The Origins Of IINK / Román García Albertos” is by far the best article in this issue. I would have hoped for more critical analysis of Zappa and his music, though, before many of the articles descended into biased Zappa-speak. Why this constant comparison between The Grande Mothers and Zappa Plays Zappa as though ZPZ were the better band? Both are unique in their own right, in my opinion. One appealing to a newer generation (ZPZ), while the other appeals to a fans more familiar with the original Mothers. It’s an important distinction to remember that the original Mothers band (then the Soul Giants) was a band for which Zappa auditioned. All the other bands were his bands. This distinction tends to get muddled along the way in certain fans (and heirs) efforts to assassinate the characters, and the musicianship, of the original Mothers.

  5. jonnybutter says:

    I especially liked one line from Mahesh’s piece: “[Zappa] was really thinking from his heart”. That is very perceptive and I totally agree. The George Szell aphorism always struck me as right: “Music is something you feel with your mind and think about with your heart”. In other words, music is a nexus – that’s why it’s The Best.

  6. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from jonnybutter:

    I especially liked one line from Mahesh’s piece: “[Zappa] was really thinking from his heart”. That is very perceptive and I totally agree. The George Szell aphorism always struck me as right: “Music is something you feel with your mind and think about with your heart”. In other words, music is a nexus – that’s why it’s The Best.

    While I agree that music “is something you feel with your mind and think about with your heart” in terms of what one likes or dislikes – a very esoteric distinction at best – but hardly solely a mind/heart nexus when it comes to Zappa’s music, itself. To suggest that Zappa’s music cannot be studied, and appreciated, objectively does his collective work, and his influence on contemporary musical forms, an immense disservice.

  7. jonnybutter says: