Beefheart Cover from Hamamatsu, Japan

Just when I thought I couldn’t be pleasantly surprised by anything posted on YouTube lately, I came across the following two Japanese Indie Bands, Blood Pees with their cover of Don Van Vliet’s “I’m Glad” and New Roman Chitose‘s “PV Volume One” (performed with pole dancers):


I suspect that these are two incarnations of the same group of musicians:

Kyo – Vocal, Guitar
Roy – Guitar, Keyboard
Jun – Trombone, Flute, Saxophone
Komei – Baritone Sax,Tenor Sax
Meg Blere – Drum
Rogie Birdman – Bass

Note: for more videos go to FMSound’s YouTube page.

14 Responses to “Beefheart Cover from Hamamatsu, Japan”

  1. Hugh says:

    I’m pretty sure that’s the two-man band from Ohio The Black Keys on top covering, ‘I’m Glad”. Beefheart Lives!

    The pole dancer adds a nice layer of sleaze to the other band. Very alluring. Does she travel with her own pole I wonder?

  2. Hugh says:

    I’ve realized my mistake after checking the Blood Pees website. Their doing a cover of The Black Keys cover of ‘I’m Glad’. Just a little confusing and that fuzzy video threw me!
    How could I doubt your musical knowledge, UrbanG?!

    I’m glad The Keys are sending out Beefheart’s music wide & far (east). :)

  3. Stewart says:

    Hi Mr Graffitto,
    Wondered if you’d seen this one before – Edinburgh band Bombskare doing a PDG ska version of Tryin’ to Grow a Chin. Even with the YCDTOSA V1 Matty told Hatty insert…
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63wE2btpCN4

  4. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from Hugh:

    I’ve realized my mistake after checking the Blood Pees website. Their doing a cover of The Black Keys cover of ‘I’m Glad’. Just a little confusing and that fuzzy video threw me!
    How could I doubt your musical knowledge, UrbanG?!

    I’m glad The Keys are sending out Beefheart’s music wide & far (east). :)

    I’m not infallible, Hugh. On those rare occasions that I am in error, though, my fellow KUR-Meisters are pretty quick to correct me (there really is no such thing as an ultimate expert on all things Zappa related – there’s just too much information for one single mind to hold – which is why I feel these online websites are so essential, and I applaud all the work that goes into their upkeep).

    Normally I wouldn’t post such a “fuzzy” video, Hugh, but once I ascertained Blood Pees were a Japanese band doing a Beefheart cover, I just had to share it – if only to point out how the music of Frank and Don successfully disseminated across borders, cultures without the aid of heavy radio or video play.

    A quote from Stewart:

    Hi Mr Graffitto,
    Wondered if you’d seen this one before – Edinburgh band Bombskare doing a PDG ska version of Tryin’ to Grow a Chin. Even with the YCDTOSA V1 Matty told Hatty insert…
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63wE2btpCN4

    Neither seen nor heard of these Scottish blokes before clicking on the link you provided, Stewart. I especially like that the saxophones have essentially replaced the lead guitars from the original. It’s one of FZ’s songs that transfers well to any interpretation. I’ll have to keep my eyes and ears open now for Bombskare, too.

  5. Roy B says:

    Hello everyone,
    I appreciate that you wrote the article on our band.
    I have three bands. The first band is named Flying Machine. The second is New Roman Chitose with pole dancer. These two bands are performing our original music.
    The third band named Blood Pees is chiefly performing the songs of The Black Keys.
    We are learning many things by covering the music of The Black Keys. As for the Lyrics, guitar sound, etc.. And we were able to meet root music of legendary musicians such as Captain Beaf Heart, R.L. Burnside, Bob Dylan and more through their music.
    However, though I was a big fan of Frank Zappa for a long time before listening their music. :)
    Anyway, we for Japanese, it’s difficult to understand the blues music.
    But I love them. so, it’s the challenge for us. We want to perform in your countries some time.

    Greeting from Japan, – Blood Pees:Roy

  6. urbangraffito says:

    Thanks for the update on your bands, Roy. For the Japanese, the blues may be difficult to understand, at first, yet I’m certain not entirely impossible, either. Every culture has it’s own unique tales of woe. I’m sure, even Japan will develop it’s own distinct kind of blues in time…

  7. Roy B says:

    Dear urbangraffito,
    Thank you for massage. I agree with you.
    Japan received the War Memorial Day of the 65th times on last August 15.
    Japan is an only nation in the world to be bombed with atomic weapons, and it doesn’t exist when the scar heals completely now.
    People recall the dying bereaved family, and pray for world peace. Those feelings might be sent to the world by music as the blues of Japan some time.   Roy,

  8. DC Boogie says:

    A quote from Roy B:

    Dear urbangraffito,
    Thank you for massage.

    What’s going on here?!! Pick Me I’m Clean, Too!

    (DC Boogie states that his comments should in no way be associated with the opinions of a certain Dark Clothes, who tries to refrain from levity and unseriousness in any form imaginable.)

  9. Dark Clothes says:

    Indeed, I have all the sympathy in the world for the Japanese and their suffering in August 1945. Keiji Haino and Makoto Kawabata are my favourite avantgarde blues guitarists these days. So I think there’s already a Japanese blues tradition to be reckoned with.

  10. urbangraffito says:

    Of course, there’s already a Japanese blues tradition to be reckoned with. I was speaking of a distinct Japanese style of blues which is not just a reworking of American blues by Japanese players. At present, all blues is basically American style blues. Individual traditions require a lot more time and much more individual history (in my rather boastful opinion).

  11. Dark Clothes says:

    Haino and Kawabata are clearly influenced by blues, and particularly Beefheart’s avantgarde blues, but their music is also very distinctive and independent.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnJGVzrYdUs

    One of the funniest concerts I’ve ever attended was “The Japanese New Music Festival” with some of these guys in different constellations. A section of the evening was devoted to Beefheart covers.

  12. urbangraffito says:

    Watching and listening to the Japanese avant garde is like viewing a newly emerging entity attempting to define itself. It leaves you with something akin to a sense of wonder.

  13. Dark Clothes says:

    If that was a much, here’s a more accessible (and absolutely stunning) piece by Kawabata and his Acid Mothers Temple, La novia:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnMrVZYk8nI

    The Acid Mothers has a record called Asolutely Freak Out Zap Your Mind, by the way :-)

  14. Dark Clothes says:

    Here’s another twisted Japanese blues, in case anyone’s interested.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ARnvuRyceQ&feature=related

    And just to tease you even more, this says something about where these people come from -

    http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61iljMqQDWL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

    :-)

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