Aphex Twin – Windowlicker

Aphex Twin (aka Richard David James) was born on August 18, 1971 in Limerick, Ireland and is an English electronic music artist. He has been described as “the most inventive and influential figure in contemporary electronic music.

While not to everyone’s taste, this particular video is both a hilarious and excellent example of Aphex Twin’s subversive and sardonic view of contemporary music culture (in plain English, rap videos).

Warning/Promise: the full uncut version of this video contains explicit language (lots of four letter words and words that people with a certain skin color are never suppose to use).

10 Responses to “Aphex Twin – Windowlicker”

  1. Andrew says:

    Buffalo – what a great CD! Barry, this is like ten years old. Why now?

  2. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from Andrew:

    Buffalo – what a great CD! Barry, this is like ten years old. Why now?

    Why not?

  3. OhTay says:

    This man is a pure genius, like others we enjoy in this a’here area.
    Favorite scene: The Cheerleader
    Great post!

  4. bernard says:

    I don’t know that much about electronic music. The easiest thing to do would be to say : that’s the Stockhausen legacy.

    However, there’s this. I’ll explore.

    By the way did you ever hear about this : http://www.scannerdot.com/sca_001.html ; Robin Rimbaud.

  5. vince says:

    Did you guys ever see that RUBBER JOHNNY video?

  6. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from vince:

    Did you guys ever see that RUBBER JOHNNY video?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IISxLrH4tH8

    I used to have wet dreams about making short movies like RUBBER JOHNNY in high school, but, alas, the technology hadn’t yet been developed to make my dreams a reality until the last ten years. So I became a writer and publisher instead.

    Rubber Johnny reminds me a lot of another classic short film, Eraserhead.

    Both are excellent examples of post-realism. What is post-realism? Best definition I’ve read was in Raymond Federman’s 1981 book, Surfiction: Fiction Now and Tomorrow, wherein he refers to post-realism as “a kind of discourse whose shape will be an interrogation, an endless interrogation of what it is doing while it is doing it, an endless denunciation of its fraudulence, of what it really is: an illusion (a fiction).” Plain english. In a world where we cannot easily tell the difference between reality and fantasy, what is real anymore? Everything becomes hyper-real.

    I’d like to think that if FZ had lived beyond ’93, he’d be doing something like these videos and short films.

  7. Hugh says:

    The make-up is quite freakish. I’m not really into electronic music but this video pulled me in.

  8. bernard says:

    Just discovered an interesting one in electronic music:
    http://brainwashed.com/mumma/music.html
    Gordon Mumma.

  9. vince says:

    A quote from urbangraffito:

    I used to have wet dreams about making short movies like RUBBER JOHNNY in high school, but, alas, the technology hadn’t yet been developed to make my dreams a reality until the last ten years. So I became a writer and publisher instead.

    Really???

    I just finished my first novel, and I could use a little advice. I’m thinking about going through Wheatmark. Do you think that’s a wise choice?

  10. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from vince:

    A quote from urbangraffito:

    I used to have wet dreams about making short movies like RUBBER JOHNNY in high school, but, alas, the technology hadn’t yet been developed to make my dreams a reality until the last ten years. So I became a writer and publisher instead.

    Really???

    I just finished my first novel, and I could use a little advice. I’m thinking about going through Wheatmark. Do you think that’s a wise choice?

    While I see absolutely nothing wrong with self publishing, vince, I’d suggest that you first divide up your novel into parts and send these parts to magazines (on line and off) and anthologies to get a sense of how other writers/publishers and the reading public might receive your novel before publishing the entire manuscript — whether through Wheatmark, or a more conventional publisher. Most books fail because the author/publisher hasn’t researched the market for it before publishing it. And there are many “vanity publishers” who prey upon new writers by keeping them paying at every step of the publishing process without any intention of truly marketing the book beyond the author’s own wallet. Buyer beware stands as a good motto. Or even better, why not start your own press?

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