Raging Slab @ De Melkweg, Amsterdam, 1993

Everyone has a secret musical pleasure. One of mine has been the music of Raging Slab. Anyone who knows me, knows I have a definite soft spot for southern rock. Perhaps what I like about Raging Slab is the unique manner in which they combine such seeming contrasting musical influences (punk, progressive, roots, metal, southern rock, country) to create their own sound.

There is no better introduction to the music of Raging Slab than their October 14th, 1993 performance at De Melkweg in Amsterdam, The Netherlands:

Part 1 (above) | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Either enjoy, or hold your nose.

7 Responses to “Raging Slab @ De Melkweg, Amsterdam, 1993”

  1. Hans says:

    Had forgotten all about this band. I am pretty sure that I have a copy of their 1993 live album “Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert “somewhere around the house.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamite_Monster_Boogie_Concert

  2. fred says:

    Lead guy Greg is an enthusiastic Beefheart admirer…

  3. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from Hans:

    Had forgotten all about this band. I am pretty sure that I have a copy of their 1993 live album “Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert “somewhere around the house.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamite_Monster_Boogie_Concert

    A quote from fred:

    Lead guy Greg is an enthusiastic Beefheart admirer…

    Indeed, Raging Slab was one of the freakiest bands to emerge out of the 1990s (when they were eventually signed and I became aware of them myself). One couldn’t help but notice the influence of 70s boogie rock and bands like Black Oak Arkansas, Lynryd Skynryd, and the Allman Brothers Band, yet with their own unique blending of roots music, blues, and of course, that late 70s punk ethos. Not as raunchy as, say, Nashville Pussy, but just as fun filled and guitar driven. I had thought I had seen the last of heavy, guitar driven, Southern rock with bands like Molly Hatchet – then Raging Slab, Nashville Pussy, and Drive-By Truckers come along and re-create the entire Southern rock genre for a new generation.

    Again and again, I find it enlightening how musicians who were at first excited by the punk movement found themselves searching out traditional southern rock for something to sink their teeth into…

  4. Dougal says:

    A quote from Dougal:

    Again and again, I find it enlightening how musicians who were at first excited by the punk movement found themselves searching out traditional southern rock for something to sink their teeth into…

    I think you’re getting this the wrong way ’round: they most likely grew up on southern rock and so it’s natural for them to go back to it at some stage.

    This is why the first punk generations were so varied: people interpreted the idea of “punk” using what they knew.
    So you had things like the Texas punk bands with a flavour of their own, or a band like Pekinska Patka with a unique sound that comes from their culture.

    Personally, I feel that the Internet has been terrible for music because it abolished regionalism and perpetrated (micro-)trends and superficiality, so everything seems to be equally bland — wherever it comes from.

  5. Dark Clothes says:

    A quote from Dougal:

    Personally, I feel that the Internet has been terrible for music because it abolished regionalism and perpetrated (micro-)trends and superficiality, so everything seems to be equally bland — wherever it comes from.

    Don’t worry – it’s just a fad!

  6. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from Dougal:

    A quote from urbangraffito:

    Again and again, I find it enlightening how musicians who were at first excited by the punk movement found themselves searching out traditional southern rock for something to sink their teeth into…

    I think you’re getting this the wrong way ’round: they most likely grew up on southern rock and so it’s natural for them to go back to it at some stage.

    This is why the first punk generations were so varied: people interpreted the idea of “punk” using what they knew.
    So you had things like the Texas punk bands with a flavour of their own, or a band like Pekinska Patka with a unique sound that comes from their culture.

    Personally, I feel that the Internet has been terrible for music because it abolished regionalism and perpetrated (micro-)trends and superficiality, so everything seems to be equally bland — wherever it comes from.

    My comment, Dougal, was a retort to what Raging Slab frontman Greg Strzempka said in the initial video: “…we went through this punk rock phase and thought, this isn’t working out, and went back and examined that (Lynryd Skynryd, Allman Brothers Band) as valid influences.

    I’m not suggesting, though, that punk did not have it’s own influence on music, then and now, only that those musicians that embraced multiple influences appeared to have had the most vibrant and eclectic careers musically.

    As for the Internet being terrible for music, that’s really somewhat of an over-generalization. The internet is just a tool. I have discovered vast amounts of “regional” music through the internet via such applications as ReverbNation through which local artists and bands from cities worldwide upload their music for fans or potential fans to listen to and download. You’ll be amazed at the sheer amounts of regional talent out in the world that the Internet brings only a click away…

  7. Dougal says:

    A quote from Dougal:

    My comment, Dougal, was a retort to what Raging Slab frontman Greg Strzempka said in the initial video: “…we went through this punk rock phase and thought, this isn’t working out, and went back and examined that (Lynryd Skynryd, Allman Brothers Band) as valid influences.

    I was merely pointing out that “went back” was likely exactly that — going back to what they grew up on — as opposed to “searching out”, which is more like 60s-band-getting-into-Indian-music-to-”evolve”… nothing to get excited about.

    As for ReverbNation, I do read blogs etc. and look up things that look interesting, but I don’t find what is produced these days aesthetically appealing — just like I can’t listen to Halloween ’81 because Wankerman’s drumming kills the music.
    But, hey, these days the news gives us all the entertainment we need! (and the bargain basement has plenty of strange old records — and on “the format god intended”…)

    Since we’re here… an album that might interest Zappa fans is No Trend’s “Tritonian Nash Vegas Polyester Complex” (1987):
    http://www.allmusic.com/album/tritonian-nash-vegas-polyester-complex-r214682
    (you can find it on the ihatethe90s blog if you want to listen)

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