Raging Slab @ De Melkweg, Amsterdam, 1993

Everyone has a secret musical pleasure. One of mine has been the music of Raging Slab. Anyone who knows me, knows I have a definite soft spot for southern rock. Perhaps what I like about Raging Slab is the unique manner in which they combine such seeming contrasting musical influences (punk, progressive, roots, metal, southern rock, country) to create their own sound.

There is no better introduction to the music of Raging Slab than their October 14th, 1993 performance at De Melkweg in Amsterdam, The Netherlands:

Part 1 (above) | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Either enjoy, or hold your nose.

7 Responses to “Raging Slab @ De Melkweg, Amsterdam, 1993”

  1. Hans says:

    Had forgotten all about this band. I am pretty sure that I have a copy of their 1993 live album “Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert “somewhere around the house.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamite_Monster_Boogie_Concert

  2. fred says:

    Lead guy Greg is an enthusiastic Beefheart admirer…

  3. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from Hans:

    Had forgotten all about this band. I am pretty sure that I have a copy of their 1993 live album “Dynamite Monster Boogie Concert “somewhere around the house.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamite_Monster_Boogie_Concert

    A quote from fred:

    Lead guy Greg is an enthusiastic Beefheart admirer…

    Indeed, Raging Slab was one of the freakiest bands to emerge out of the 1990s (when they were eventually signed and I became aware of them myself). One couldn’t help but notice the influence of 70s boogie rock and bands like Black Oak Arkansas, Lynryd Skynryd, and the Allman Brothers Band, yet with their own unique blending of roots music, blues, and of course, that late 70s punk ethos. Not as raunchy as, say, Nashville Pussy, but just as fun filled and guitar driven. I had thought I had seen the last of heavy, guitar driven, Southern rock with bands like Molly Hatchet – then Raging Slab, Nashville Pussy, and Drive-By Truckers come along and re-create the entire Southern rock genre for a new generation.

    Again and again, I find it enlightening how musicians who were at first excited by the punk movement found themselves searching out traditional southern rock for something to sink their teeth into…

  4. Dougal says: