Malcolm McLaren: A Belated RIP

For one thing, he did manage to make this happen:

24 Responses to “Malcolm McLaren: A Belated RIP”

  1. Clark Gwent says:

    Why has C4 blocked it in Wales? I am watching C4 on my TV right now!

  2. sterbus says:

    To get a record deal, he said,
    They would have to be more punk.

  3. urbangraffito says:

    First there was Frank Zappa, followed shortly by Kurt Mcgettrick then Vince Welnick of the Tubes, then more recently Jim Carroll, and now Malcolm McLaren. It seems every day the list gets longer.

  4. Matt says:

    You forgot Jimmy Carl Black.

  5. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from Matt:

    You forgot Jimmy Carl Black.

    Shame on me for forgetting (even momentarily) the Indian of the Group. In a parallel universe, Matt, I am certain Jimmy was the first Cherokee/Cheyenne Superstar (he certainly is in mine).

  6. Sterbus says:

    Vic Chestnutt, Mark Linkous, Alex Chilton (only in the last three months)

  7. Hermann Schindler says:

    Hey guys, as sad as it is in the case of FZ, of course the list gets longer every moment. No one gets out here alive!
    This stupid place here has always been very interesting. We adapt very well, forgot? (Still I have to confess, I haven’t found anything as exciting as Frank’s music in all these years.)

  8. Jamez says:

    McLaren not only brought Punk to the world’s attention, he was also partly responsible for bringing Hip-Hop to the UK aswell.

  9. Jamez says:

    A quote from urbangraffito:

    First there was Frank Zappa, followed shortly by Kurt Mcgettrick then Vince Welnick of the Tubes, then more recently Jim Carroll, and now Malcolm McLaren. It seems every day the list gets longer.

    RIP Vince (of the Tubes and the Grateful Dead), McLaren and Jim Carroll (Punk Poet).

  10. gooey miles says:

    cant believe you give these no talent scum bags any ink !total frauds

  11. gooey miles says:

    talking about the sex pistols not those other cats

  12. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from gooey miles:

    cant believe you give these no talent scum bags any ink !total frauds

    i agree, gooey, the sex pistols couldn’t play worth shit, but one must certainly acknowledge their affect on popular culture and fashion – and a whole slew of post-punk bands that came after (mostly influenced musically by the clash i would add).

    still, one cannot help but sense that we are coming to some kind of an end of an era with all these iconoclastic musical figures heading off on their last tours. we won’t ever see their likes again methinks…

  13. Paul Sempschi says:

    I’m not a big fan of the punk movement (which is partially responsible for skaterpunks) but I have to admit that “Never Mind the Bollocks” has a certain charm to it. And it’s a pity that today’s pissy little brats arent rocking out to them. Really, I’d take Johnny Rotten over all the Emos put together (BODIES!!!).

    I’m a big Ramones + (Danzig era) Misfits fan too, great stuff!

  14. Clark Gwent says:

    It is a mistake to say they couldn’t play worth shit because they certainly could.

  15. Jamez says:

    A quote from urbangraffito:

    A quote from gooey miles:

    cant believe you give these no talent scum bags any ink !total frauds

    i agree, gooey, the sex pistols couldn’t play worth shit, but one must certainly acknowledge their affect on popular culture and fashion – and a whole slew of post-punk bands that came after (mostly influenced musically by the clash i would add).

    still, one cannot help but sense that we are coming to some kind of an end of an era with all these iconoclastic musical figures heading off on their last tours. we won’t ever see their likes again methinks…

    The only one who couldn’t play was Sid ’cause he was messed up on heroin. Steve Jones is a better guitarist than most people give him credit for.

  16. Barry's Imaginary Publisher says:

    Sometimes music isn’t so much about sophistication and/or technical prowess. Sometimes music transforms itself into an accutely subversive and relevant force which goes beyond these restrictive idioms. That is when music transcends from being captivating into exilhirating.

    So thank you Mr McLaren, wherever you are…

  17. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from Clark Gwent:

    It is a mistake to say they couldn’t play worth shit because they certainly could.

    It isn’t a mistake, it is only an opinion. What is one person’s prior is another’s pariah – it’s all a matter of taste and, in the case of the Sex Pistols, promotion.

    How many other musical acts have become part of Popular culture with questionable abilities and musical talent? Talent isn’t necessary for success, and neither is technical prowess.

  18. Clark Gwent says:

    Some fell on stony ground…………..

  19. gooey miles says:

    ITS all about image with all this main stream crapola.

  20. urbangraffito says:

    Is everybody happy?
    Oh, never mind!
    No problem

  21. Barry's Imaginary Publisher says:

    A quote from gooey miles:

    ITS all about image with all this main stream crapola.

    In this, our glorious post-modern era, The Sex Pistols may well have become a brand à la Lady Gaga, and the term “main stream crapola” might therefor apply – and perhaps they were crapola to begin with even (though I would kindly disagree on that premise).

    But this is — crucially so — knowledge-in-retrospect.

    The Pistols (and by proxy, McLaren), whether unwittingly or not, changed the course of popular music by making the right music that had the right attitude at the right moment in time — and there is no way you can deny that…

  22. urbangraffito says:

    I completely agree, Barry. Whether you like punk music or not, or The Pistols (and by proxy, McLaren), they altered the course of popular music in the late 1970s the same way that The Car’s debut album altered the course of popular music, too. Sure, in hindsight, those bands, and those albums can seem quite dated now – but at the time people thought they were revolutionary. Personally, at the time, in the 80s, I simply abhorred the music that was being produced, and turned off to most but a handful of bands. Now Time Life is selling nostalgia CD’s covering “The 80s Generation”. It’s still mostly musak to me (at least what gained heavy rotation on radio and MTV). Still, even a musical curmudgeon like myself can find diamonds in the raw among the crappola and musak.

  23. brainpang says:

    For the naysayers and clueless, check out Greil Marcus’ book LIPSTICK TRACES wherein the blueprint for punk rebellion is revealed to be inspired by Raoul Vaneigm, Guy Debord and the theories of the Situationist International. It takes a lot more than shock value and a good beat to change the world. Now, some say it’s bull but there’s just too much evidence to deny it didn’t play a role.

  24. gooey miles says:

    Yea it played a role for suckers …..it was a fad like hoola hoops

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