Off The Bus

I’m just sayin’… Adios Nonino.

8 Responses to “Off The Bus”

  1. David Ocker says:

    Thank you for that! Ever notice how the really good 20th century composers had their own ensembles?

  2. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from David Ocker:

    Thank you for that! Ever notice how the really good 20th century composers had their own ensembles?

    It does surprise me at all. Nothing is ever created in a vacuum. For instance, ever notice how many of the very same ensemble musicians which performed FZ’s compositions, went on to perform much of the solo works of George Duke, Jean-Luc Ponty, and Billy Cobham? Talent recognizes talent, just as genius recognizes genius.

  3. bernard says:

    Fully agree: now we’re entering the erea of the Masters.
    Yes Piaz. is one of the great 20th century composers. And, strange story- he was one of the first- coming from a different world- both geographically & genre linked – to be recognised as such by the classical western music oficionados. In the 70 ties. Rightfully. Yes, for sure , my grandchildren will have to undergo listening to Piaz. as a way of education.

    – The accordion is a strange phenomenon. iJust have a look at your music dictionaries & otherdata bases. It’s simply the organ ( hand made as well) of the common people. Allowing them to take music further, making use of its great musical & technical potential.
    Implementing it in contemporary art, amongst many others : Fred Van Hove ( BE ) and Guy Klucevsek ( NY, however from Central Europe) . And many others youngsters are taking that musical instrument further

    – I might be wrong when I pretend that Spanish / Latin American music ( excluding Brazil, which happens to be Portuguese mixed with coca cola) didn’t take that much steps further ever since.
    However there’ for instance this: bridgerecords.com/pages/catalog/9241.htm

    OK thisis a remark besidet he question : should composerbe able & willing s perform their own compositions? The way I see it : it doesn’t matter.

  4. Balint says:

    Goooood!!

  5. P. C. says:

    Latin America is not a unified cultural entity. There are many facts and details that make extremely difficult to say anything about “Spanish / Latin American” music as a whole, in the same way that it’s difficult to say anything about “English / Australian / Canadian / American / South African” music. If we focus only on popular music, the diversity of sounds, traditions, instruments and styles in Latin America is even greater than among English-speaking countries. (I do not know why).
    Same language, yes. Lot of cultural similarities, yes. But not the same.
    And please, do not think that “accordion” and “bandoneĆ³n” are the same instrument!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandone%C3%B3n
    It’s a common mistake, but tango (Piazzolla was a tango musician) has nothing to do with accordion.

  6. Balint says:

    A quote from David Ocker:

    Thank you for that! Ever notice how the really good 20th century composers had their own ensembles?

    I always think this way of Steve Reich, too. He always “makes” music, always plays, has his own ensemble, records his own material (often). The process of playing the music often makes his to change his very first ideas, etc. I like his works. šŸ™‚

  7. urbangraffito says:

    A quote from P. C.:

    Latin America is not a unified cultural entity. There are many facts and details that make extremely difficult to say anything about “Spanish / Latin American” music as a whole, in the same way that it’s difficult to say anything about “English / Australian / Canadian / American / South African” music. If we focus only on popular music, the diversity of sounds, traditions, instruments and styles in Latin America is even greater than among English-speaking countries. (I do not know why).
    Same language, yes. Lot of cultural similarities, yes. But not the same.
    And please, do not think that “accordion” and “bandoneĆ³n” are the same instrument!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandone%C3%B3n
    It’s a common mistake, but tango (Piazzolla was a tango musician) has nothing to do with accordion.

    Thanks for your comment, P. C.

    You are absolutely correct. If one limits one’s listening to only popular western music, there is a vast pool of musical diversity that is going untapped and unheard. Even from one individual South American country to another, the variations are astounding. Just take the popular Portuguese language music of Brazil, for instance. There is really so much musical variation in the world: why limit oneself to just one kind?

  8. Pablo says:

    I’m from Argentina, and I grew up listening to Astor’s music. I’m not going to force similarities between his and FZ’s music, maybe the main thing both creators had in common -besides a moustache with a imperial that AP used for years- was an attitude of “this is my music and if you don’t like it, well, screw you”. They also collaborated with the Kronos Quartet.

    But, listen to AP’s Enrico IV (from the soundtrack of the movie with the same name, 1985) and compare it with the Yellow Shark arrangment of Be Bop Tango. I’d say that there’s a stylistic link between them. Also ,Piazzolla’s bandoneon phrasing sometimes exhibited the ryhtmic influence of Stravinsky and Bartok.

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